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Care & Wellness

  • Proudly scruffy and plain-Jane brown, the Border Terrier looks like a mutt, and he would not have it any other way. A working terrier with a hard, wiry coat and bristly muzzle, the Border Terrier does not have time for lots of showing off or aggressive terrier posturing. He is calm, cool, collected, and ready to go for a walk, chase the rabbits out of the garden, or just sit contentedly beside you.

  • Despite their beautiful presence, in their natural habitat, formerly Russia, Borzois were among the most skilled hunting dogs, masterful at tracking, sighting, and running down wolves. It is this legacy that makes them most suitable for country living.

  • This much-loved dog is one of the few purebreds created and established in the United States. Although he is all dog, this Bostonian tough guy is a sweet and affectionate companion animal. The main interest of a Boston Terrier is to be with you.

  • The Bouvier des Flandres was bred in Belgium to drive cattle, pull carts and protect the farm. When properly trained and socialized, the Bouvier makes a fine canine companion, but make no mistake - although technically a herding breed, the Bouvier has a strong personality and a guard-dog instinct.

  • Box turtles can be very fairly easy to care for type of turtle. It needs to be mentioned that there are several medical conditions that are known with box turtle ownership. Every box turtle owner should be aware that any swelling, change in energy level or food intake needs veterinary attention relatively soon.

  • Boxers show their indefatigable enthusiasm for life with their muscled, wiggly bodies and by wagging their little stub of tail. Always ready for play and affection, Boxers make good family dogs.

  • When governor Richard W. Riley signed into law the act making the Boykin Spaniel the state dog in South Carolina, he said it was because of the fierce dedication, stalwart loyalty, noble character, and eagerness for both hard work and lively play exemplified by this native breed.

  • Breeding, pregnancy, and birthing in cats may seem simple, but can have complications. Cats can have multiple litters in a year. It is important to know when your cat may be expecting to give birth so that you can be available to provide assistance if necessary. It is important to know what signs indicate that your cat may be experiencing difficulties delivering the kittens and know when veterinary attention is needed.

  • You can place most puppies in their new homes at around eight to ten weeks of age, ideally after ten weeks of age to ensure proper weaning and maximum social development. Treating for worms and first vaccinations should occur before puppies are placed in their new homes.

  • For the next two months, even if everything went smoothly with the birth, you have a lot of work to do! After the birthing process, clean up the mother as much as possible without upsetting her using a warm water and washcloth. Do not use any soaps or disinfectants unless instructed to by your veterinarian. Remove any soiled newspaper or bedding from her whelping box. Normally the new mother will spend most of her time with the puppies. It is important to have the mother and puppies examined by your veterinarian within forty-eight hours of birth. The veterinarian will check the mother to make sure there is no infection and that she is producing sufficient milk. The puppies will also be examined to make sure that there are no birth defects such as cleft palates. Any necessary medications or injections will be administered during this visit.